Don’t Lose Your Page

By Carolyn Shearlock © 2015 • all rights reserved

Keeping Your Place in Chart Books and Cruising Guides: When you're entering a new harbor or just wanting to double-check something on the chart, it's helpful to be able to instantly turn to the page you need. Here's how we do it.

When we’re underway for more than a daysail, we always keep our charts and cruising guides out on the nav station. Open to the correct page, of course.

The only problem is that the motion of the boat and gusts of wind can cause the page to turn or, worse yet, the whole book to fall to the floor.

Quick tip: we stick a Post-It note on the page currently in use and remove any left from the previous trip. That way, it’s very quick to find the page we need — as you’re heading into a new anchorage and wanting to double-check something, the last thing you want to do is spend precious minutes finding the page again.

The Post-Its are also a good place to make any quick notes that we might need to refer to on the way, although we try to make “permanent” notes — things that would apply on future trips, too — right in the margins of the applicable page.

When appropriate, we’ll also mark the pages for fallback options and put those on a different side of the book or use a different color Post-It (say the primary anchorage post it is at the top of the page and the back ups are on the side). Again, it’s all about having the info we need quickly at hand.

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Comments

  1. Such a simple great idea that I never thought about! Thanks

  2. Also a good use of post its is when plotting using all paper charts, number your courses and put the post its on the appropriate pages…easy to reference and get to the leg you need. Old school never fails.

  3. I use the plastic paper clips that come in different colors. If I clip them to the appropriate page and bundle several pages together, the weight holds it open, also reusable. Some of the cruising guides have mini maps, so I highlight the route, and put the date on it, that gives me a reference to what I’ve done, and when I did it. So far, I haven’t done the same thing twice, so I will have to think about what to do when that happens. 😉

  4. Bob Grenier says:

    Something we do as soon as we purchase our cruising books is take them to one of the “office supply” stores and have them spiral bound. This usually runs less than $7.00 and the book lays flat on the page we want. We also use post-it notes and the combination of these two work GREAT!

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